Food/agriculture

Casale Podere Rosa

In the north-east of Rome there is an old country side building where more then 20 years ago a bunch of willing and motivated people decided to take up an abandoned area to develop an entire microcosm of activities.

La Citta dell’Utopia

The idea that the world can be more sustainable is lived in a demonstrative way in Rome’s Citta dell’Utopia. Its users believe in a shared, communal philosophy and give physical space to many other local cultural and social associations. Members contribute to meeting a demand that they see unfilled in the city – Italian language courses are taught by volunteers, physical fitness and sports activities as well as social programs for psychological support are offered.

Rosa Rose – more than just a Berlin garden

The initiative “Rosa Rose’’ is one of the community garden projects in Berlin. The initiative started in 2004, when a group of neighbours in the Berlin district of Friedrichshain began turning a 2000m² brownfield into a garden to create their own little oasis. The idea was to grow vegetables, some fruits and herbs and create a green space and dog area that would also be open to passers-by. But unfortunately the oasis had to be abandoned a few years later, due to a planned construction.

Stadt Macht Satt – Berlin’s grass roots initiative

Stadt macht satt (“Harvest the city”) is an initiative in Berlin that tries to answer the questions: “How can we use food resources in the city more efficiently? How can urban gardening bring food production closer to the people that are physically and mentally separated from nature?” Anja Fiedler, founder of Stadt macht satt, offers strategies and practical solutions to these questions. As an expert in sustainable development education, she provides know-how on urban gardening, and where fruits and vegetables can be harvested for free.

Foodsharing Germany

The beginnings of the initiative can be found in two German cities, Cologne and Berlin, in 2012. In Cologne the online-platform foodsharing.de was invented to allow private individuals to share still edible food which would otherwise be thrown away because they bought too much or because they are going on vacation. At the same time in Berlin, a similar initiative “lebensmittelretten” was founded by Raphael Fellmer, a motivated “dumpster diver”, who lives on food that would be thrown away by supermarkets. Several companies were contacted and asked to collaborate.

Ecovillage of Bromarf

In the southern-most part of Finland, in a small village called Bromarf an ecovillage project was launched in 2000 and a plot size of 2.5 hectares was purchased. The Martha Association was one of the main funders of the project (together with local private sponsors), which aimed at providing altogether 20 residences mainly for elderly people and young adults. The following goals paved the way: new vitality to the village, enhancement of current building culture and of ecology, fresh entrepreneurship, energy economy, healthy building and increasing recycling awareness.

Herttoniemi Urban Food Co-operative

In 2010 people at Herttoniemi, Helsinki, Finland started looking for solutions for sustainable food production by starting their own food co-operative. The basic idea is that the members of the co-operative rent a piece of land and employ a farmer to farm the field. After paying a certain price for the membership the member is entitled to receive a share of the crops. During the harvesting season the members receive their share once a week. Also a 10 h work commitment at the weekly bee is included in the membership.

The Participatory Energy Plan of Sant Martí de Provençals, La Verneda and La Pau

The Participatory Energy Plan of Sant Martí de Provençals, La Verneda and La Pau (known as PEP) is a community-based initiative operating in three working class neighborhoods in Barcelona, Spain. It was created in the autumn of 2010. Originally inspired by the Transition movement coming from Totnes, the group is working towards a more environmentally and socially sustainable neighborhood. PEP proposes a collaborative way of managing the energy use at a neighborhood scale, focusing on decentralization, sensibilization and the citizen participation.

The Dutch land use system

This study applies the Multi Level Perspective (MLP) on the Dutch land use system. It combines niche and regime analyses to assess the feasibility of a transition in the Dutch land use system. For this, the following niches are considered: Business and biodiversity, agricultural nature conservation, resilient landscapes, renewable energy, urban farming, and tourism. The regime analysis is broken down into the following regimes: nature, water, and urban.

The Portuguese land use system

This study applies the Multi Level Perspective (MLP) on the Portuguese land use system. It combines niche and regime analyses to assess the feasibility of a transition in the Portuguese land use system. For this, the following niches are considered: Biodiverse cities, business and biodiversity, multifunctionality for renewable energy, fire resilient landscapes, land sharing and Integrated Territorial Interventions (ITI), rewilding, and biodiverse pastures. The regime analysis is broken down into the following regimes: agriculture, forest, nature, and urban.

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